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dc.contributor.authorHigdon, Rachel Deltaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T14:51:01Z
dc.date.available2016-06-21T14:51:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-06
dc.identifier.citationHigdon, R. (2016) Employability: The missing voice: How student and graduate views could be used to develop future higher education policy and inform curricula. Power and Education, 8 (2), pp. 176-195en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/12181
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractThe student voice is currently absent from the employability agenda for higher education in the UK. A government-led neoliberal model of employability, claiming what employers want when employing graduates, has been uncritically adopted by many universities in Britain to inform higher education strategy and policy. Many undergraduates and graduates perceive this employability model as incongruent and disingenuous to their experiences in gaining and sustaining work. The dominant employability discourse masks inequalities in the contemporary labour market. In developing policies for the future of higher education, British government departments should recognise the student lens by researching students’ qualitative experiences and reflections of teaching, learning and work. Students should be a collaborative part of future planning and their voices should be continuously informing higher education practice. Student and graduate views can be used to inform higher education curricula and to develop meaningful, future policy relating to higher education.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.subjectneoliberalismen
dc.subjectgovernment policyen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectemployabilityen
dc.subjectstudent voiceen
dc.subjectinequalityen
dc.subjectundergraduatesen
dc.titleEmployability: The missing voice: How student and graduate views could be used to develop future higher education policy and inform curriculaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1757743816653151
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.fundern/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NC-NDen
dc.date.acceptance2016-05-09en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justiceen


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