Perceptions of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

Date

2016-11-21

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

cogent

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a novel bio-medical HIV prevention op- tion for individuals at high risk of HIV exposure. This qualitative interview study ex- plores perceptions and understandings of PrEP among a sample of 20 HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the UK, where there is a debate about the feasibility of o ering PrEP on the NHS. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis and social representations theory from social psychol- ogy. The following three themes are discussed: (1) uncertainty and fear, (2) man- aging relationships with others, and (3) stigma and categorization. HIV-negative interviewees generally perceived PrEP as a risky solution for “high risk” individuals, while HIV-positive individuals regarded it as potentially enhancing interpersonal relations between serodiscordant partners. Social stigma overwhelmingly under- pinned individuals’ perceptions of PrEP. This might inhibit access to PrEP among those who might bene t most from it, thereby undermining HIV prevention e orts.

Description

open access article

Keywords

Citation

Jaspal, R. and Daramilas, C. (2016) Perceptions of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Cogent Medicine. 3: 1256850.

Rights

Research Institute

Media Discourse Centre (MDC)
Mary Seacole Research Centre