Social participation and speech impairment in Parkinson's disease

Date

2012-03

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DOI

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Type

Conference

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Background: although speech impairment and intelligibility have been investigated in some detail in Parkinson’s disease, relatively little is known about the specific impact of these factors on social functioning. Aims: the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of level of intelligibility on social communication. Method and Procedure: two groups of speakers with Parkinson’s disease, differentiated by level of intelligibility as mildly and moderately impaired, and a matched, non-neurologically involved control group were compared using measures of social anxiety, social activity type and frequency and social network size and composition. Results and Outcome: social anxiety and frequency of engagement in social situations did not differ significantly between groups. Overall range of social activities did not differ between groups. Unimpaired speakers reported more leisure activities and greater frequency of activity. Speakers with PD reported more organised activities. Satisfaction with number of social activities was significantly worse among PD speakers. Size of social network did not differ significantly by group but severity of speech involvement affected network composition. Conclusion: poorer intelligibility in this population was not significantly associated with negative changes to patterns of social activity. Social anxiety and social network size were not affected by speech impairment.

Description

Keywords

Dysarthria, social participation, Parkinson's disease, social networks, social anxiety

Citation

Brown, A., Rowley, D.T. and Brown, B. (2012) Social Participation and Speech Impairment in Parkinson's Disease. International Motor Speech Conference, Santa Rosa CA

Rights

Research Institute

Institute for Allied Health Sciences Research
Institute of Health, Health Policy and Social Care
Mary Seacole Research Centre