The clinical governance of the soul: 'deep management' and the self-regulating subject in integrated community mental health teams

Date

2003-01-01

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

0277-9536

Volume Title

Publisher

Elsevier

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Abstract

Health professionals have often been described as if they were in conflict with the new managerialist spirit in health care. However, because of their distributed and mobile sites of intervention, the work of community teams presents particular problems for traditional notions of management. In this UK study we identify how mental health team members are regulated by means of a subtle "deep management". Team members point to a lack of management direction from senior colleagues, even though some of them participate in the management process themselves. However, the lack of overt management leads them to prioritise clients and foreground professional identities in performing their duties and much additional administrative work besides. This also meant that the organisational structure of the team was defined in subjective terms. Participants had become self-regulating "deep managed" subjects under a largely hands-off management regime.

Description

This paper led on to international collaborations with Australian scholars, and has yielded further publications such as a book chapter on personality disorder and a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Applied Linguistics

Keywords

RAE 2008, UoA 11 Nursing and Midwifery, clinical governance, self-regulation, mental health, community care

Citation

Brown, B. J., Crawford, P. (2003) The clinical governance of the soul: 'deep management' and the self-regulating subject in integrated community mental health teams. Social Science & Medicine, 56 (1), pp. 67-81.

Rights

Research Institute

Institute of Health, Health Policy and Social Care
Mary Seacole Research Centre