Up or Down? How Culture and Color Affect Judgments

Date

2013-08-21

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

1099-0771

Volume Title

Publisher

Wiley

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

In the Mainland China stock market, an upmarket is represented by the color red, whereas a downmarket is represented by the color green. Elsewhere, including the Chinese Hong Kong stock market, the color representations are the opposite. Three studies were conducted to examine the red-up–green-down effect for Mainland Chinese as well as the green-up–red-down effect for Hong Kong people. Study 1 showed that Mainland Chinese tended to predict greater economic growth (study 1a) and higher growth in consumption trends (study 1b) when the experimental materials were presented in red than in green, whereas Hong Kong participants exhibited the opposite tendencies. Study 2 found that Mainland Chinese implicitly associated red and green with up and down, respectively; Hong Kong people, however, implicitly associated green and red with up and down, respectively. Study 3 further indicated that Mainland Chinese were more likely to predict good outcomes when scenarios were presented in red, whereas Hong Kong participants were more likely to predict good outcomes when scenarios were presented in green. These findings suggest that culturally specific environment cues could influence human prediction and judgment. Implications for judgment generally are discussed.

Description

The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

color, judgment, decision-making, environmental cues

Citation

Jiang, F. et al. (2013) Up or Down? How Culture and Color Affect Judgments. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, 27 (3), pp.226–234

Rights

Research Institute

Institute for Psychological Science