Local energy policy and managing low carbon transition: The case of Leicester, UK

Date

2015

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Elsevier

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

National and local energy policies are implemented within a complex energy landscape that makes any evaluation of their impacts far from straightforward. Drawing upon a case study of Leicester this paper argues that the ability of local authorities to deliver significant energy savings within this landscape is questionable, albeit with other additional benefits being realised (e.g. job creation, community engagement). It examines existing domestic energy demand and multiple deprivation data for Leicester and neighbouring cities and combines this with a qualitative description of the transition process. The paper identifies the need for a more systematic analysis of how national energy policy translates to the local level and concludes that it is problematic even for a leading, pro-active and innovative local authority to have a statistically meaningful energy policy. Even where energy policies are favourable, carbon reduction is less easy to realise than other e more local - co-benefits and that in the light of significant financial and co-ordination constraints more attention needs to be given to how local communities can be more effectively supported in their desire to meet (or exceed) national targets.

Description

Article is available by Open Access on the publisher's website.

Keywords

Local energy policy, local authorities, energy transition

Citation

Lemon, M., Pollitt, M. and Steer, S. (2015) Local Energy Policy and Managing Low Carbon Transition: The Case of Leicester, UK. Energy Strategy Reviews, 6, pp. 57-63

Rights

Research Institute

Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD)