Qualitative analysis of qualitative evaluation: an exploratory examination of investigative interviewers' reflections on their performance

Date

2017-10-12

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

1068-316X

Volume Title

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Self-evaluation of interviews conducted by law enforcement professionals is a principal feature of a prescribed interview framework in England and Wales, underpinning their practice development. However, self-evaluation has been found in prior research to be neglected. Building on our recent study (which found that interviewers regularly over-rated themselves, when compared to our independent ratings), the same interviewers assessed their interview skills by way of completing an extensive reflective log. We found that those we regarded as skilled in our prior study tended to be more accurate in identifying their strengths and areas for improvement, while planning to correct such shortfalls in their future practice. On the other hand, those we had earlier rated as least skilled tended to be much less reflective, being both descriptive and inaccurate in their understanding of key interview tasks. They also remained inaccurate concerning their own interview skills, failing to be prospective in planning to improve their skills. As such, while reflective logs appear to be, for skilled interviewers, both a prompt for accurate self-assessment and a catalyst for planning further professional development, we also caution that such tools need further refinement to achieve the same goals for those either less reflective or less skilled.

Description

The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

PEACE model, investigative interviewing, self-evaluation, reflection, skills evaluation

Citation

Griffiths, A. & Walsh, D. (2018) . Qualitative analysis of qualitative evaluation: an exploratory examination of investigative interviewers' reflections on their performance. Psychology, Crime & Law, 24 (4), pp. 433-450

Rights

Research Institute

Centre for Law, Justice and Society