Direct Mayoral Elections in Slovenia and England: Traditions and Trends Compared

Date

2015

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

1581-5374

Volume Title

Publisher

Lex Localis

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Direct mayoral elections have in recent decades become an important and popular feature of many local governments across Europe. The direct election of the mayor enhances the accountability and transparency of local political leadership and gives voters the opportunity to gain important influence on local politics. This contrasts with councillors who choose the mayor in single-party private settings. This article provides a case study analysis of two directly elected mayors in contrasting political settings, namely England and Slovenia. Whereas England is regarded as the mother of all Parliaments, Slovenia’s democratic traditions are more recent. Yet nonetheless Slovenia displays all the features of a strong local democracy where an independent mayoral system operates within a nonpartisan political setting. By contrast, whereas England provides the longest-standing case of local democracy in Europe, directly elected mayors have only recently been introduced into the political system, the outcome of which has been mixed in terms of successfulness and acceptance by national political parties within municipalities.

Description

Keywords

direct elections, England, local politics, mayor, partisanship, political parties

Citation

Kukovič, S., Copus, C., Haček, M. and Blair, A. (2015) Direct Mayoral Elections in Slovenia and England: Traditions and Trends Compared. Lex Localis – Journal of Local Self-Government, 13 (3), pp. 697-718

Rights

Research Institute

Local Governance Research Centre (LGRC)