Refugees and the End of Empire

Date

2017-08

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Type

Book chapter

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

The major Empires that collapsed during the twentieth century produced successor states which developed new forms of exclusivist nationalist ideologies which identified, and often expelled, sectors of their populations that did not possess the right ethnic ‘credentials’. This process first manifested itself with the end of the Ottoman Empire, where successor states in the Balkans ‘exchanged’ populations while the newly nationalist rump Turkey eliminated or expelled its Armenian and Greek populations. These processes continued after 1945 because the collapse of the British and French colonial Empires were accompanied by population ‘exchanges’ and expulsions, especially in the case of India/Pakistan. Finally, the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Empire triggered a new mass refugee crisis. This chapter examines the relationship between imperial collapse, the emergence of successor nationalism, and the exclusion of ethnic groups with the wrong credentials.

Description

Keywords

Decolonization, refugees, population removal, population exchange, partition, violence, ethnicity, ethnic conflict

Citation

Panayi, P. (2017) Refugees and the End of Empire. In: Thomas, M. and Thompson, A. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of the Ends of Empire. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rights

Research Institute

Institute of History