How do Undergraduate students construct their view of cybercrime? Exploring definitions of cybercrime, perceptions of online risk and victimisation

Date

2018-12-26

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

1752-4512

Volume Title

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

While cybercrime is recognized as an increasing problem in society, it is unclear how users perceive cybercrime and online risks. This qualitative study explored how undergraduate students in England, a group who are at relatively high risk of victimization, viewed language and concepts associated with cybercrime. Three focus groups were conducted with a total of 16 18- to 21-year-old undergraduate students, and data were analyzed inductively and thematically. The themes explored in this article include: the physical world versus the virtual world; confusion regarding the law (including a perceived lack of police interest in responding to cybercrime); the normalization of risky or harmful online behaviour; and victimization. The themes also point towards a variety of misconceptions about cybercrime alongside an ambivalence towards the potential risk of becoming a victim. The data provide a potential step towards tailoring education packages and awareness programmes to ensure at-risk groups are equipped with actionable mechanisms to protect themselves. Further research is suggested in terms of exploring how such perceptions can be changed through effective training and awareness programmes, potentially reducing the level of risk in this group.

Description

The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

Undergraduate Risk, Cybercrime, Qualitative research

Citation

Conway, G. and Hadlington, L.J. (2018) How do Undergraduate students construct their view of cybercrime? Exploring definitions of cybercrime, perceptions of online risk and victimisation. Journal of Policing; Policy and Practice,

Rights

Research Institute

Institute for Psychological Science