How the ubiquity of eyewitness media changes the mediation and visibility of protests in the news

Date

2018-07-20

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Routledge

Type

Book chapter

Peer reviewed

No

Abstract

This chapter examines how eyewitness footage travels from the street, through verification procedures in newsrooms, or diffusion on social media until it reaches our screens, and whether its ubiquity, the fact it is now systematically collected, processed and authenticated by newsrooms, has changed the mediation and visibility of protests. It argues that eyewitness footage is polysemic and polyvalent, because it is easily stripped of the context of its original upload, to appear in different contexts, with different descriptions, advancing different interpretation of events and different political goals. Eyewitness media of protests complicates journalism’s task of providing a trusted record of the present.

Description

Keywords

UGC, Amateur images, eyewitness media, witnessing, news, newsrooms, journalism, verification, protest, social media, TV, cross-media agenda setting

Citation

Hänska, M. and Bode, M. (2018) How the Ubiquity of Eyewitness Media Changes the Mediation and Visibility of Protests in the News. In: Robertson, A. (Ed.) Screening Protest: Visual Narratives of Dissent across Time, Space and Genre, Abingdon: Routledge.

Rights

Research Institute

Media Discourse Centre (MDC)