Killing animals: sociology, species relations and institutionalized violence

Date

2015-02-01

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

0038-0261

Volume Title

Publisher

Sage

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Influential voices have argued for a sociology which acknowledges the way we are co-constituted with a range of non-human species as part of the condition of life on this planet. Despite this, sociology has generally retained a conception of the social that is centred on the human. This paper argues for the inclusion of non-human animals in sociological agendas, focusing on the emerging field of the sociology of violence. It examines the institutions and processes through which non-human animals are subjected to different forms of violence, most notably, mass killing.The practice of killing animals is routine, normative, institutionalized and globalized. The scale of killing is historically unprecedented and the numbers killed are enormous. The paper argues that this killing of non-humans raises questions around inequalities and intersectionality, human relations with other species, the embedding of violence in everyday practices and links between micro and macro analyses. These are questions with which the new sociology of violence might engage.

Description

The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

human-animal relations, institutionalized violence, farmed animals, companion animals

Citation

Cudworth, E. (2015) Killing animals: sociology, species relations and institutionalized violence. The Sociological Review. 63 (1), pp. 1-18.

Rights

Research Institute

Institute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justice