‘No Home but in Memory’: The Legacies of Colonial Rule in the Punjab

Date

2011

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Palgrave

Type

Book chapter

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

This chapter explores the legacies of colonial rule in the Punjab and its consequences for those who were uprooted due to Partition. Individual accounts highlight the longevity of the resettlement process, rebuilding homes and lives, which at times went on for ten to fifteen years. Some refugees moved a number of times before finally settling down, this restlessness and loss of their homeland is evident through oral narratives that capture those traumatic years of being perpetually displaced. The chapter then focuses on individuals who chose to leave and resettle in Britain. This is at a time when nationalism and patriotism was at its height in the two new states. What compelled these individuals to migrate to a country that had subjugated their land for over 300 years? And why having already been displaced did they chose to go through that process again?

Description

Keywords

partition, Punjab, migration, refugees

Citation

Virdee, P. (2011) ‘No Home but in Memory’: The Legacies of Colonial Rule in the Punjab. In: Panayi, P. and Virdee, P. eds. Refugees and the End of Empire: Imperial Collapse and Forced Migration in the Twentieth Century. Palgrave MacMillian, pp. 175-196

Rights

Research Institute

Institute of History