Application of probabilistic models for multitone electromagnetic immunity analysis

Abstract

The operational environment of modern electronic systems may include multiple frequency electromagnetic dis- turbances. However, immunity measurements usually employ single frequency continuous waveforms (i.e. single-tones). The performance of two oscillator circuits with different topologies (one simulated and one measured) were used as case studies to in- vestigate immunity to simultaneous single-tone disturbances (i.e. multitones) using probabilistic Bayesian network models. For the multitone analysis, the noisy-OR model was first used to identify the type of causal interactions between simultaneously occurring single-tones. Probabilistic theories derived from the recursive noisy-OR model, which inherits the independence assumptions of the noisy-OR and any known causal dependence between simultaneously occurring single-tones, were then used to predict the probability of higher order multitone failures. For the two case studies, the probability of three-tone failures was estimated using the single-tone and two-tone failure probability values. An improved adaptive recursive noisy-OR model was also proposed to overcome the practical difficulties of obtaining multitone failure probabilities, from either simulations or measurements.

Description

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 812790 (MSCA-ETN PETER). The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

Bayesian networks, electromagnetic interference, failure probability, multitone immunity, noisy-OR, recursive-noisy-OR (RNOR), synergistic effect

Citation

Devaraj, L. et al. (2022) Application of probabilistic models for multitone electromagnetic immunity analysis. IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility, 64 (6), pp. 2067 - 2079

Rights

Research Institute