Networked communication and the Arab Spring: Linking broadcast and social media

Date

2014-06-05

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

SAGE

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

A plethora of media platforms were involved in communicating recent protests across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), though it remains unclear exactly how these interacted. This qualitative article, based primarily on interviews with British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) newsworkers, explores the networked linkages between social and broadcast media, asking how social media content moved into broadcast news, which standards shaped the interface between the two and how these standards were defined. It finds that a set of normative and practical standards caused significant friction at the interface, which is reduced as content assimilates these standards. Standards are shaped mainly in response to broadcast imperatives, but also through the mainstreaming of social media and more efficacious and practicable networked communicative practices, indicating how power may shift in the networked age. Responding to the optimistic view that networked multimedia environments enable unencumbered communication, it argues that the scope and limits of communicative affordances depend on these standards.

Description

Keywords

Media and Communication, New Media, User Generated Content

Citation

Hänska Ahy M (2016) Networked Communication and the Arab Spring: Linking broadcast and social media. New Media & Society 18 (1), pp. 99-116

Rights

Research Institute

Media Discourse Centre (MDC)