Virginia Woolf's "Two Women", or, "The Wrong Way of Reading"

Date

2011

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DOI

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Publisher

Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée

Type

Book chapter

Peer reviewed

Abstract

This paper reads Virginia Woolf’s ‘Two Women,’ a 1927 review of two biographical works, in relation to A Room of One’s Own (1928) and ‘The Wrong Way of Reading,’ a short biographical review from 1920. Woolf’s sustained enquiry into the historical repression of middle-class women in ‘Two Women’ closely anticipates her investigation into the socio-economic obstacles that have stifled women writers in A Room of One’s Own. Following the unorthodox approach to reading biography that she set out in ‘The Wrong Way of Reading,’ Woolf adapts her sources in ‘Two Women,' and again when re-reading this material in A Room of One’s Own, in order to emphasise her feminist critique. Woolf’s willingness to manipulate biographical documents to suit her critical purpose indicates her subversive attitude to the authority of fact and reflects her position as a feminist reader and critic.

Description

Keywords

Virginia Woolf, feminism, A Room of One's Own, biography

Citation

Wood, Alice (2011) Virginia Woolf’s “Two Women,” or, “The Wrong Way of Reading”. In: Bernard, C., ed. Woolf as reader/Woolf as critic or, the art of reading in the present : Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée, Montpellier, pp. 51-60.

Rights

Research Institute

Institute of English