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dc.contributor.authorCulley, Lorraineen
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Nickyen
dc.contributor.authorLohan, M.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-05T09:20:32Z
dc.date.available2013-07-05T09:20:32Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationCulley,L., Hudson, N. and Lohan, M. (2013) Where are all the men? The marginalization of men in social scientific research on infertility. Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 27 (3), pp. 225-235en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/8793
dc.descriptionNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for the publication in Reproduction Biomedicine Online. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structurak formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Reproduction Biomedicine Online. Mini symposium on men and infertility, 27 (3): 225 – 235. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1472648313003544
dc.description.abstractThere is a wealth of research exploring the psychological consequences of infertility and assisted reproduction technology: a substantial body of sociological and anthropological work on ‘reproductive disruptions’ of many kinds and a small but growing literature on patient perspectives of the quality of care in assisted reproduction. In all these fields, research studies are far more likely to be focused on the understandings and experiences of women than those of men. This paper discusses reasons for the relative exclusion of men in what has been called the ‘psycho-social’ literature on infertility, comments on research on men from psychological and social perspectives and recent work on the quality of patient care, and makes suggestions for a reframing of the research agenda on men and assisted reproduction. Further research is needed in all areas, including: perceptions of infertility and infertility treatment seeking; experiences of treatment; information and support needs; decisions to end treatment; fatherhood post assisted conception; and the motivation and experiences of sperm donors and men who seek fatherhood through surrogacy or co-parenting. This paper argues for multimethod, interdisciplinary research that includes broader populations of men which can contribute to improved clinical practice and support for users of assisted reproduction treatmenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherReproductive Biomedicine Onlineen
dc.subjectAssisted reproduction technologyen
dc.subjectInfertilityen
dc.subjectInterdisciplinaryen
dc.subjectMasculinityen
dc.subjectMenen
dc.subjectPsycho-socialen
dc.titleWhere are all the men? The marginalization of men in social scientific research on infertilityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2013.06.009
dc.researchgroupReproduction Research Groupen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.researchinstituteCentre for Reproduction Research (CRR)en


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