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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Brian J.
dc.contributor.authorNerlich, Brigitte
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKoteyko, Nelya
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Ron
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-28T11:23:45Z
dc.date.available2009-09-28T11:23:45Z
dc.date.issued2009-09-25
dc.identifier.citationBrown,B., Nerlich, B., Crawford, P., Koteyko, N. & Carter, R (2009) Hygiene and Biosecurity: The Language and Politics of Risk in an Era of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sociology Compass 3 (5): 811-823.en
dc.identifier.issn1751-9020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/2624
dc.description.abstractInfectious diseases, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and avian influenza, have recently been high on the agenda of policy makers and the public. Although hygiene and biosecurity are preferred options for disease management, policy makers have become increasingly aware of the critical role that communication assumes in protecting people during outbreaks and epidemics. This article makes the case for a language-based approach to understanding the public perception of disease. Health language research carried out by the authors, based on metaphor analysis and corpus linguistics, has shown that concepts of journeys, pathways, thresholds, boundaries and barriers have emerged as principal framing devices used by stakeholders to advocate a hygiene based risk and disease management. These framings provide a common ground for debate, but lead to quite different perceptions and practices. This in turn might be a barrier to global disease management in a modern world.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the ESRC (research grant no. RES-000-23-1306) for the project ‘Talking cleanliness in health and agriculture’ of which this paper forms a part.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen
dc.subjectinfectionen
dc.subjectdiseaseen
dc.subjectmetaphoren
dc.subjecthabitusen
dc.subjectrisken
dc.titleHygiene and biosecurity: The language and politics of risk in an era of emerging infectious diseasesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-9020.2009.00230.x
dc.researchgroupParticipation & Social Justice
dc.researchgroupPsychology
dc.researchgroupHealth Policy
dc.researchgroupMary Seacole Research Centre
dc.researchgroupHealth Policy Research Unit
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Health, Health Policy and Social Careen
dc.researchinstituteMary Seacole Research Centreen


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