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dc.contributor.authorMcGale, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorHardman, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorJones, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Sam
dc.contributor.authorDuckworth, Jay Joseph
dc.contributor.authorMead, Bethan
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Carl
dc.contributor.authorField, Matt
dc.contributor.authorWerthmann, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-06T09:05:13Z
dc.date.available2020-10-06T09:05:13Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-06
dc.identifier.citationMcGale, L. et al. (2020) Food-related attentional bias and its associations with appetitive motivation and body weight: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Appetite,en
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/20239
dc.descriptionIn collaboration with researchers in Universities of Liverpool, Sheffield and Freiburg The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractTheoretical models suggest that food-related visual attentional bias (AB) may be related to appetitive motivational states and individual differences in body weight; however, findings in this area are equivocal. We conducted a systematic review and series of meta-analyses to determine if there is a positive association between food-related AB and: (1.) body mass index (BMI) (number of effect sizes (k)=110), (2.) hunger (k=98), (3.) subjective craving for food (k=35), and (4.) food intake (k=44). Food-related AB was robustly associated with craving (r = .134 (95% CI .061, .208); p < .001), food intake (r = .085 (95% CI .038, .132); p < .001), and hunger (r = .048 (95% CI .016, .079); p = .003), but these correlations were small. Food-related AB was unrelated to BMI (r =.008 (95% CI -.020, .035); p = .583) and this result was not moderated by type of food stimuli, method of AB assessment, or the subcomponent of AB that was examined. Furthermore, in a between-groups analysis (k = 22) which directly compared participants with overweight/obesity to healthy-weight control groups, there was no evidence for an effect of weight status on foodrelated AB (Hedge’s g = 0.104, (95% CI -0.050, 0.258); p =.186). Taken together, these findings suggest that foodrelated AB is sensitive to changes in the motivational value of food, but is unrelated to individual differences in body weight. Our findings question the traditional view of AB as a trait-like index of preoccupation with food and have implications for novel theoretical perspectives on the role of food AB in appetite control and obesity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.titleFood-related attentional bias and its associations with appetitive motivation and body weight: A systematic review and meta-analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NC-NDen
dc.date.acceptance2020-10-01
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Psychological Scienceen


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