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dc.contributor.authorBerghs, Maria
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T10:20:55Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T10:20:55Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationBerghs, M. & Dyson, S.M. (2020) Intersectionality and Employment in England: Where are all the Black Disabled People? Disability and Society, (In Press).en
dc.identifier.issn0968-7599
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/20206
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper begins by giving a description of the relationship between austerity and the neoliberal policy focus on work in the UK, and how this impacts negatively on disabled people. It examines why Black disabled people’s employment experiences have been missing in the literature despite the fact that they are more affected by austerity. Black disabled people’s experiences in the job market tend to focus on racism and discrimination, whilst other struggles linked to disability, and what this implies for Black people, are poorly understood. A case study, of Black disabled workers, living with the sickle cell condition, is examined to comprehend why more nuanced intersectional research might be needed to understand why some Black people’s experiences of employment remain invisible.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectintersectionalityen
dc.subjectemploymenten
dc.subjectdisabilityen
dc.subjectracismen
dc.subjectBlacken
dc.subjectBAMEen
dc.titleIntersectionality and Employment in England: Where are all the Black Disabled People?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderOther external funder (please detail below)en
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2020-09-22
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen
dc.funder.otherBig Lottery, Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning (DRILL)en


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