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dc.contributor.authorCudworth, E.
dc.contributor.authorHobden, S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-16T11:07:07Z
dc.date.available2020-06-16T11:07:07Z
dc.date.issued2010-11-08
dc.identifier.citationCudworth, E. and Hobden, S. (2010) Anarchy and Anarchism: Towards a Theory of Complex International Systems. Millennium: Journal of International Studies, 39(2), pp. 399-416.en
dc.identifier.issn0305-8298
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/19777
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractThe use of ‘anarchy’ in International Relations theory appears very different from its incarnations in political philosophy. Whilst realist scholars have used anarchy to describe an absence of centralised political authority in which states wield differential power, political philosophers in the anarchist tradition have mounted a critique of the coercive and compulsory powers of states themselves. This article argues for reconceptualising ‘anarchy’ in International Relations theory using insights from complexity theory. We would describe the international system as a complex adaptive system which has a tendency to self-organisation. Furthermore, in distinct contrast to Waltz, we argue that the international system has to be seen as embedded within a range of physical systems, and other social systems including those which reproduce a range of (gendered, racial, class-based, colonial) relations of domination. Here insights from anarchist social ecologism can be utilised to further accounts of hierarchy and dominance within International Relations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.subjectanarchyen
dc.subjectBookchinen
dc.subjectcomplexity theoryen
dc.subjectinternational systemsen
dc.subjectintersectionalityen
dc.subjectKropotkinen
dc.subjectsocial dominationen
dc.subjectWaltzen
dc.titleAnarchy and Anarchism: Towards a Theory of Complex International Systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177%2F0305829810384677
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2010
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Research in Criminology, Community, Education and Social Justiceen
dc.exception.ref2021codes254aen


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