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dc.contributor.authorWittekind, Anna
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Camille
dc.contributor.authorStamataki, Nikoleta
dc.contributor.authorBeauchamp, Gary
dc.contributor.authorBonnema, Angela
dc.contributor.authorDussort, Pierre
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Sigrid
dc.contributor.authorde Graaf, Cees
dc.contributor.authorHalford, Jason
dc.contributor.authorMarsaux, Cyril
dc.contributor.authorMattes, Richard
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlin, John
dc.contributor.authorMela, David
dc.contributor.authorNicklaus, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, Ian
dc.contributor.authorMcGale, Lauren
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T09:44:57Z
dc.date.available2020-05-12T09:44:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-13
dc.identifier.citationWittekind, A., Higgins, K., Schwartz, C., Stamataki, N., Beauchamp, G., Bonnema, A., Dussort, P., Gibson, S., de Graaf, C., Halford, J., Marsaux, C., Mattes, , R., McLaughlin, J., Mela, D., Nicklaus, S., MacDonald, I., McGale, L. (2018) A workshop on ‘Dietary Sweetness—Is It an Issue?’. International Journal of Obesity, 42, pp.934–938.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/19578
dc.descriptionopen access articleen
dc.description.abstractThis report summarises a workshop convened by ILSI Europe on 3 and 4 April 2017 to discuss the issue of dietary sweetness. The objectives were to understand the roles of sweetness in the diet, establish whether exposure to sweetness affects diet quality and energy intake, and consider whether sweetness per se affects health. Although there may be evidence for tracking of intake of some sweet components of the diet through childhood, evidence for tracking of whole diet sweetness, or through other stages of maturity are lacking. The evidence to date does not support adverse effects of sweetness on diet quality or energy intake, except where sweet food choices increase intake of free sugars. There is some evidence for improvements in diet quality and reduced energy intake where sweetness without calories replaces sweetness with calories. There is a need to understand the physiological and metabolic relevance of sweet taste receptors on the tongue, in the gut and elsewhere in the body, as well as possible differentiation in the effects of sustained consumption of individual sweeteners. Despite a plethora of studies, there is no consistent evidence for an association of sweetness sensitivity/preference with obesity or type 2 diabetes. A multifaceted integrated approach, characterising nutritive and sensory aspects of the whole diet or dietary patterns, may be more valuable in providing contextual insight. The outcomes of the workshop could be used as a scientific basis to inform the expert community and create more useful dialogue among health care professionals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectdietary sweetnessen
dc.subjectappetiteen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectnutritionen
dc.subjectsweetenersen
dc.titleA workshop on Dietary Sweetness—Is It an Issue?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2017.296
dc.funderOther external funder (please detail below)en
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NC-NDen
dc.date.acceptance2017-11-10
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Psychological Scienceen
dc.exception.ref2021codes254aen
dc.funder.otherNorth American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), Technical Committee on Carbohydratesen


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