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dc.contributor.authorPhelan, J. P.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T15:05:04Z
dc.date.available2019-02-18T15:05:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-24
dc.identifier.citationPhelan, J. P. (2020) '“How came they here?” Longfellow’s “The Jewish Cemetery at Newport,” Slavery, and Proto-Zionism'. English Literary History, 87 (1), pp. 121-147en
dc.identifier.issn0013-8304
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/17563
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractThis article places Longfellow’s much-anthologised elegy in context, highlighting its engagement with contemporary debates about slavery, racial difference, and the restoration of the Jews to their ancestral homeland. The poem’s complex textual history, reconstructed here for the first time, helps to explain its profoundly ambivalent attitude towards the vanished Jewish community of Newport, Rhode Island; their cemetery is both a monument to the shameful history of ‘Christian hate’ which drove them from Europe, and an emblem of the eventual fate of a people obsessed with the impossible dream of reviving the past and entangled in the ongoing horrors of slavery.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Pressen
dc.subjectHenry Wadsworth Longfellowen
dc.subjectPoetryen
dc.subjectZionismen
dc.subjectSlaveryen
dc.title“How came they here?” Longfellow’s “The Jewish Cemetery at Newport,” Slavery, and Proto-Zionismen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1353/elh.2020.0004
dc.researchgroupCentre for Textual Studies (CTS)en
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2018-12-16en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Englishen


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