Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEmmerson, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T14:15:43Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T14:15:43Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationEmmerson, S. (2018) Feeling sound. In: Music Analysis and the Body: Experiments, Explorations and Embodiments (Nicholas Reyland, Becky Thumpston eds.), Leuven: Peeters. Leuven Studies in Musicology 6. pp. 191-208en
dc.identifier.isbn9789042936416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/16897
dc.description.abstractI have been listening to electronically produced and mediated music for about 45 years and I can clearly recall the thrill of early performances I attended, broadcasts and recordings I listened to. What was it that attracted me to this new soundworld? How would I describe the sensations (both physical and emotional) that such sound elicited then and still does now? On some of these occasions I would describe my response as ‘transcendental’. My aim in this chapter is to encourage a vocabulary of describing responses to electroacoustic sound – in this I treat the perception system and the body as inseparable; the psychology of being thrilled is clearly not just a mental act but profoundly embodied. I will focus on music made with technology, whether in studios or produced live, and that is finally heard through loudspeakers – ‘electroacoustic’ sound.en
dc.publisherPeetersen
dc.titleFeeling sounden
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.researchgroupMusic Technology and Innovation - Institute for Sonic Creativity (MTI2)en
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceN/Aen
dc.researchinstituteMusic, Technology and Innovation - Institute for Sonic Creativity (MTI2)en


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record