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dc.contributor.authorJaspal, Rusien
dc.contributor.authorPage, Matthewen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-02T09:42:01Z
dc.date.available2018-08-02T09:42:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-21
dc.identifier.citationJaspal, R. and Page, M. (2018) Enhancing HIV prevention and care among men who have sex with men: insights from social psychology. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 94, pp. 472-473en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/16418
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractMen who have sex with men (MSM) are a key population in the HIV epidemic in Western industrialised societies. Significant strides have been made in preventing HIV infection in MSM—indeed, a 60% decrease in HIV incidence was observed in London at the end of 2016.1 This can be attributed to the combined effect of treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in high-risk MSM. However, sexual risk-taking, inconsistent condom use and low uptake of PrEP remain obstacles to eradicating new HIV transmissions. Advances have also been made in enhancing HIV care. In England, 87% of MSM living with HIV have been diagnosed and over 90% are now on effective antiretroviral therapy (ART).2 Yet, some patients struggle to accept and adjust to their HIV diagnosis. Some decide not to initiate ART. Some are lost to follow-up. Often, the underlying causes are psychosocial in nature. We believe that social psychology has a role to play in developing steps to improve HIV prevention efforts and patient engagement with HIV care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltden
dc.titleEnhancing HIV prevention and care among men who have sex with men: insights from social psychologyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2018-053745
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2018-07-01en
dc.researchinstituteMedia Discourse Centre (MDC)en
dc.researchinstituteMary Seacole Research Centreen


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