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dc.contributor.authorLopes, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorYu, Huien
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T12:40:46Z
dc.date.available2017-10-19T12:40:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-24
dc.identifier.citationLopes, B. and Yu, H. (2017) Who do you troll and why: An investigation into the relationship between the Dark Triad Personalities and online trolling behaviours towards popular and less popular Facebook profiles. Computers in Human Behavior, 77, pp. 69-76en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14667
dc.descriptionopen access articleen
dc.description.abstractThis experiment examined the influence of Dark Personalities in trolling behaviour towards popular and less popular Facebook profiles. One-hundred and thirty-five participants were recruited to view two fake Facebook profiles and rated on how much they would agree with some trolling comments to each profile, as well as how they perceived themselves in comparison to each profile in terms of social acceptance and rank. In addition, participants completed the short dark personality questionnaire. Results suggested Psychopathy was positively associated with trolling behaviours while Narcissism was associated with a tendency to see oneself superior to others. Moreover, the higher the Psychopathy score the more likely the participants would troll the popular profile. On the other hand, the higher the Narcissism score, the more likely participants perceive themselves more superior to the popular profile. These analyses revealed the different influence Dark Personality traits play on different behavioural tendencies. The discussion on the dynamics among the Dark Personalities in relationship with online behaviours and the implications of the study were also included.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectDark Personality Triaden
dc.subjectTrollingen
dc.subjectSocial Comparisonen
dc.subjectPopular and Less Popular Facebook Profilesen
dc.titleWho do you troll and why: An investigation into the relationship between the Dark Triad Personalities and online trolling behaviours towards popular and less popular Facebook profiles.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.08.036
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.explorer.multimediaNoen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NC-NDen
dc.date.acceptance2017-08-24en
dc.exception.reasonopen access articleen
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Psychological Scienceen


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