Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jeanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T11:53:47Z
dc.date.available2015-03-10T11:53:47Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-03
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, J. (2015) 'From the first soccer Women's World Championship in 1991 to the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008: how capacity-building in small-scale tournaments can help win mega-event bids'. In: Holt, R. & Ruta, D. (eds.) Routledge Handbook of Sport and Legacy. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 259-270en
dc.identifier.isbn9780415675819
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/10767
dc.description.abstractEvent management is competitive as well as co operative. How do smaller nations or those without a track record of hosting major events build the human capacity to win larger bids. Through a case study of the 1991 women's world championship in PR China to the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, this chapter explores the idea of a bidding legacy in building human resource.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectmega eventsen
dc.subjecthuman resourceen
dc.subjectexpertiseen
dc.subjectbidding legacyen
dc.title'From the first soccer Women's World Championship in 1991 to the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008: how capacity-building in small-scale tournaments can help win mega-even bids'en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.4324/9780203132562-20
dc.researchgroupInternational Centre for Sports History and Cultureen
dc.explorer.multimediaNoen
dc.fundernoneen
dc.projectidnoneen


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record