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dc.contributor.authorChattoo, Sangeetaen
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Karlen
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorAhmad, Waqar I.U.en
dc.contributor.authorAnionwu, Elizabeth N., 1947-en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-09T14:29:34Z
dc.date.available2015-02-09T14:29:34Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationChattoo, S; Atkin, K; Dyson, SM; Ahmad, WIU and Anionwu, EN (2014) Living with Sickle Cell or Beta Thalassaemia Trait: Implications for Identity and Social Life. ESRC Report (ES/1035508/1)York: University of York.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/10633
dc.description.abstractPrevious policy oriented and sociological research on sickle cell and thalassaemia disorders has tended to focus on how carrier status impacts on reproductive choices or decisions related to antenatal screening. We know little about how being a ‘healthy carrier’ impacts on people’s ideas about health and illness or, more broadly, their sense of social relationships and identity at different phases of the life-course.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Yorken
dc.subjectsickle cellen
dc.subjectthalassaemiaen
dc.subjectgenetic carrieren
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectsociologyen
dc.subjecthealth and social careen
dc.titleLiving with Sickle Cell or Beta Thalassaemia Trait: Implications for Identity and Social Lifeen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.researchgroupUnit for the Social Study of Thalassaemia and Sickle Cellen
dc.peerreviewedNoen
dc.explorer.multimediaNoen
dc.funderESRC (Economic and Social Research Council)en
dc.projectidES/1035508/1en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen


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