Leicester Media School

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    Για τον Ανδρέα
    (2024-06-20) Landy, Leigh
    An invited composition for the celebration concert of Andreas Mniestris becoming an Emeritus Professor, this miniature was composed for the festival of the Summer Academy at the Ionian University, Corfu in July 2024. Its source material consists of recomposed elements from Mniestris' electroacoustic compositions as well as recordings of his extended techniques on alto saxophone. The piece is complemented by recordings of texts from the composer in Greek and English 'read' by Google Translate voices.
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    Forest Fire Detection Utilizing Ghost Swin Transformer with Attention and Auxiliary Geometric Loss
    (Elsevier, 2024-06-29) Siewe, Francois; Wang, Lili; Li, Haiyan; Ming, Wenjun; Li, Hongsong
    Forest fires are a devastating natural disaster. Existing fire detection models face limitations in dataset availability, multi-scale feature extraction, and locating obscured or small flames and smoke. To address these issues, we develop a dataset containing real and synthetic forest fire images, sourced from a UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) perspective. Additionally, we propose the Ghost Convolution Swin Transformer (GCST) module to extract multi-scale flame and smoke features from different receptive fields by integrating parallel Ghost convolution and Swin Transformer. Subsequently, we design a lightweight reparameterized rotation attention module, which captures interactions across channel and spatial dimensions to suppress background noise and focus on obscured flames and smoke. Finally, we introduce a loss function, called Efficient Auxiliary Geometric Intersection over Union (EAGIoU), which employs an auxiliary bounding box to accelerate the model's convergence while integrating the geometrical principles of the predicted and real bounding boxes to accurately locate small flames and smoke. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that our method achieves 75.2% mAP@0.5 and 42% mAP@0.5:0.95 with a frame rate of 239 frames per second, indicating a significant improvement in accuracy and real-time performance compared to state-of-the-art techniques. The code and datasets are available at https://github.com/luckylil/forest-fire-detection.
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    Assessing the Provenance of Student Coursework
    (2024-07-09) Coupland, Simon
    The Higher Education sector is mobilising vast resources in its response to the use of Generative AI in student coursework. This response includes institutional policies, training for staff and students and AI detection tools. This paper is concerned with one aspect of this fast-moving area; the assessment of the provenance of a piece of written student coursework. The question of the provenance of student work is a surprisingly complex one, which, in truth can only ever be answered by the student themselves. As academics we must understand the difference between checking for plagiarism and generative AI use. When assessing a student's possible use of generative AI there is no ground truth for us to test against and this makes the detection of AI use a completely different problem to plagiarism detection. A range of AI detection tools are available, some of which have been adopted within the sector. Some of these tools have high detection rates, however, most suffer with false positive rates meaning institutions would be falsely accusing hundreds of students per year of committing academic offences. This paper explores a different approach to this problem which complements the use of AI detection tools. Rather than examining the work submitted by a student, the author examines the creation and editing of the that work over time. This gives an understanding how a piece of work was written, and most importantly how it has been edited. Inspecting a documents history requires that it is written on a cloud-based platform with version history enabled. The author has created a tool which sits on top of the cloud-based platform and integrates with the virtual learning environment. The tool records each time a student digitally touches their work, and the changes are recorded. The tool interface gives an overview for a cohort, with the ability to delve more deeply into an individual submission. The result is an easily accessible interactive history of a document during its development, giving some kind of provenance to that document. This history of construction and editing, shows how a piece of written work has been crafted over time, providing useful evidence of academic practice. Data on the points where students digitally touch their work can also be useful beyond questions of academic practice. The Author gives an example of using a data-driven approach to give formative feedback and discusses how data-driven approaches could become common in teaching practice.
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    Block delivery as the future of Higher Education? Learning from design and implementation
    (2024-07-09) Allman, Zoe
    Aiming to enhance the student learning experience De Montfort University (Leicester, UK) embarked on a significant university-wide curriculum transformation project, to review and redesign academic programmes of study for delivery in an intensive, block modular approach. The approach enhances consistency of curriculum design and delivery through the development and implementation of standardised 30 credit, sequential, block modules per level of undergraduate study. Curriculum transformation facilitated opportunities for teams within the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Media, to revisit, reimagine and redesign the curriculum in response to student feedback, employer and industrial recommendations aligned with graduate outcomes, and a desire to create a future-facing unique curriculum offer that best responds to the needs of students, individually and collectively. The strategic leader for this curriculum transformation within the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Media, which is home to around 5,500 students at the Leicester campus, explains the rationale and process that facilitated re-validation (curriculum approval) for 51 programmes in a fourteen month period; the majority within just three months, and those requiring greater liaison with external accrediting bodies taking a little longer. Each programme required a unique set of considerations, aligned with the underlying principles of the University’s approach to change, recognising the varied nature of content, delivery and engagement across a wide range of taught subjects. Opportunities and challenges arising through extensive and fast-paced curriculum transformation, both within the Faculty and across the University, are explored through this presentation. Alongside curriculum change was the need to review and re-align academic regulations and academic processes to facilitate re-validation and delivery in reduced timeframes. An overview of changes will be summarised, along with how exemptions from the University’s standard model were considered and supported. Examining innovation and inclusivity at the heart of this curriculum change, as well as impact within the first two years of delivery, the continuous evolution of academic programmes is explored. Learning from curriculum design and curriculum change processes provides insights into the most effective methods for initial curriculum redesign. As the second year of delivery in the new block approach concludes, learning and impact from the initial experiences of students and staff are explored, considering strengths and areas for further development, enhancement and growth. As a Faculty and University we ask what comes next for Higher Education? Is block delivery the future?
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    Building future-focused education at  De Montfort University – block by block
    (Advance HE, 2024-07-03) Allman, Zoe; Brooks, Nicola; Goldsmith, Chris; Orwin, Claire
    De Montfort University has introduced a new university curriculum sequencing and delivery approach, known as Education 2030. From September 2022 students began to embrace learning in a new sequential, block format. This presentation by the Associate Dean (Academics) explains how the Education 2030 approach was adopted and embraced across their respective subjects, and the opportunities and challenges this created along the way. The session reflects on the process of transformational change to ensure a future-focused education, and the learning from the first two years of delivery of academic programmes in the Education 2030 format.
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    Peer mentoring in the Placement experience search
    (Oxford Centre for Academic Enhancement and Development (OCAED), 2024-06-18) Allman, Zoe; Rughani, Deepa; Grierson, Phil; Toth, Regina
    At De Montfort University, within the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Media, students seeking a year-long placement experience in the graduate workplace participate in peer mentoring during the placement search. This mentoring experience enhances the learning journey of individuals acting in the role of mentee and mentor, delivering benefits for the mentee and mentor (Hayman et al., 2022). Supporting and empowering placement searchers, mentoring presents an opportunity to learn from peers who have previously experienced the process, successfully securing an innovative placement year. Mentees engage with practical tips and advice, guidance and encouragement, whilst mentors develop leadership, mentoring and communication skills, enhancing reflection to further articulate their placement experience (Proctor, 2012). Hayman, R., Wharton, K., Bruce-Martin, C., & Allin, L. (2022). Benefits and motives for peer mentoring in higher education: an exploration through the lens of cultural capital. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning, 30(2), 256-273. https://doi.org/10.1080/13611267.2022.2057098 Procter, C. (2012). Peer mentoring to secure student placements. Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, 2(2), 121-131. https://doi.org/10.1108/20423891211224603
  • ItemOpen Access
    From Costume Romps to Queer Milestones: Adaptation, Collaboration, Queerness and Modernism in the ‘Long New Wave’ of Richardson, Schlesinger and Reisz
    (Edinburgh University Press, 2024-06) Monk, Claire
    The post-New Wave films and trajectories of the key British New Wave directors remain under-analysed terrain, both in terms of their potential relevance for interrogating how we understand the British New Wave itself and for the terms in which we might conceptualise a ‘Long’ New Wave. This essay departs from persisting auteurist approaches to consider the post-New-Wave oeuvres and careers of these directors collectively, in terms which foreground the importance of collaborations and networks rather than individual authorship and seek to decentre, denaturalise and potentially dislodge their pre-eminent association with Northern, British, social realism and its presumed legacies. I argue for the importance of a cluster of less-analysed areas of intersection and development which emerge across the eclectic filmmaking careers of Tony Richardson and John Schlesinger (and, to a lesser extent, Karel Reisz) in the immediate post-New Wave decade from the 1963 success of Richardson’s Tom Jones to the early 1970s. My discussion pivots on two commonalities: during this time, all three directors contributed significantly and plurally to innovations and advances in genre and representation across two areas distinct from British Northern working-class realism: historical/costume film genres, and queer representation. An approach which centres the (broadly defined) queer elements in these directors’ post-New-Wave oeuvres – intersecting at times with their equally undervalued contribution to ‘pre-heritage’ period cinema – reveals the ‘Long’ New Wave as substantially a cinema of adaptation, collaboration and queerness which encompassed important, near-forgotten, international projects as well as modernist influences and, in Schlesinger’s Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971), a significant advance in realist queer representation.
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    Optimal operation of reverse osmosis desalination process with deep reinforcement learning methods
    (Springer, 2024-05-13) Golabi, Arash; Erradi, Abdelkarim; Qiblawey, Hazim; Tantawy, Ashraf; Bensaid, Ahmed; Shaban, Khaled
    The reverse osmosis (RO) process is a well-established desalination technology, wherein energy-efficient techniques and advanced process control methods significantly reduce production costs. This study proposes an optimal real-time management method to minimize the total daily operation cost of an RO desalination plant, integrating a storage tank system to meet varying daily freshwater demand. Utilizing the dynamic model of the RO process, a cascade structure with two reinforcement learning (RL) agents, namely the deep deterministic policy gradient (DDPG) and deep Q-Network (DQN), is developed to optimize the operation of the RO plant. The DDPG agent, manipulating the high-pressure pump, controls the permeate flow rate to track a reference setpoint value. Simultaneously, the DQN agent selects the optimal setpoint value and communicates it to the DDPG controller to minimize the plant’s operation cost. Monitoring storage tanks, permeate flow rates, and water demand enables the DQN agent to determine the required amount of permeate water, optimizing water quality and energy consumption. Additionally, the DQN agent monitors the storage tank’s water level to prevent overflow or underflow of permeate water. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the designed RL agents.
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    “’A New Hope’: From American Graffiti to Star Wars”
    (University Press of Kentucky, 2024) Krämer, Peter
    This chapter takes a 1973 interview with George Lucas, who was about to release his first major hit movie, American Graffiti, as a starting point for a series of reflections on my own engagement from the 1990s onwards with the filmmaker's career and the move towards something one might want to call Lucas Studies; on the overall trajectory and underlying logic, but also the improbabilities, of Lucas's career up to the late 1970s; and in particular on numerous factors helping to shape his most successful movie, Star Wars (1977). I discuss trends in public opinion in the United States and in US box office charts as well as Lucas's astute perception of these trends, which led to his focus on fantasy and optimism in developing Star Wars.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Histoires de Soldats
    (Empreintes Digitales, 2024-02-28) Young, John
    This high definition downloadable album contains two works: An Angel At Mons (2014), dur. 11:23 (stereo reduction from 15.1 channel original). Once He Was a Gunner (2020), dur. 56:35, in 26 sections (stereo work). [Prelude, Sora Valley, The Canadian Club, First civilians, Faenza, Flashback: El Alamein memory, Villanova, The truck, The shrapnel, Balsorano, What was his name, now?, The brickworks, Dov'è la Nuova Zelanda?, What the heck was his name, now?, The wrong way, Do you remember in Faenza?, Friendly fire, Senio River—nothing left, An open door, After Cassino , Found in Chicago, The princess, April 1945, Trieste, Stretto, Returning.]
  • ItemOpen Access
    Histoires de Soldats
    (Empreintes DIGITALes, 2024-02-28) Young, John
    This compact disc contains two works: An Angel At Mons (2014), dur. 11:23 (stereo reduction from 15.1 channel original). Once He was a Gunner (2020), dur. 56:35, in 26 sections (stereo work). [Prelude, Sora Valley, The Canadian Club, First civilians, Faenza, Flashback: El Alamein memory, Villanova, The truck, The shrapnel, Balsorano, What was his name, now?, The brickworks, Dov'è la Nuova Zelanda?, What the heck was his name, now?, The wrong way, Do you remember in Faenza?, Friendly fire, Senio River—nothing left, An open door, After Cassino , Found in Chicago, The princess, April 1945, Trieste, Stretto, Returning.] Programme notes and purchase information at https://electrocd.com/en/album/6579-histoires-de-soldats
  • ItemOpen Access
    Scaling Form
    (University of Florence Press, 2024-06-01) Young, John
    This paper examines the question of formal scale in acousmatic music, aiming to identify ways in which relationships between a composer’s materials shape or determine the duration of the final form. Successful short and long forms in music are traditionally regarded as encapsulating a sense of completeness with notions such as narrative, development, departure and return as informing principles—the nature of which may influence formal scale. Yet, as with many contemporary music practices, acousmatic music may not always be read in terms of such established teleological models. The digital tools we find at the heart of acousmatic music make it possible to fabricate large quantities of new sounds very quickly, with signal processing and synthesis routines capable of giving composers unanticipated sonic outputs, setting up challenges for sorting, sifting and valorising materials with a view to formal design. That given, in order to locate some formal mechanisms, attention is given to ways in which materials are initially shaped and presented in a work, using the metaphor of ‘formed and ‘forming’ spaces. Through analysis of selected acousmatic pieces the idea of the ‘design impression’ is used to show through how salient levels of musical form can be identified and that comparable readings of acousmatic forms can be made across different formal scales.
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    Espaces Lointains
    (Empreintes DIGITALes, 2024-02-28) Young, John
    This compact disc contains six acousmatic compositions: Sweet Anticipation (2018 rev 2021), dur: 17:26 (stereo reduction from 16-channel original) Arioso (2021), dur: 9:38 (stereo work). Hidden Spaces (2019), dur: 9:46 (stereo work, in three movements: Räfstad, Montréal, Dobbiaco). Filaments and Phases (2022-23), dur: 11:37 (stereo reduction from 8-channel original). Three Spaces in Mid-Air (2017), dur: 10:56 (stereo work, in three untitled movements). Le Chant en Dehors (2021-22) , dur: 10:08 (stereo reduction from 18 channel 'dome' format original). Programme notes and purchase information at https://electrocd.com/en/album/6578-espaces-lointains
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    Espaces Lointains
    (Empreintes DIGITALes, 2024-02-28) Young, John
    This downloadable album contains six acousmatic compositions: Sweet Anticipation (2018 rev 2021), dur: 17:26 (stereo reduction from 16-channel original) Arioso (2021), dur: 9:38 (stereo work). Hidden Spaces (2019), dur: 9:46 (stereo work, in three movements: Räfstad, Montréal, Dobbiaco). Filaments and Phases (2022-23), dur: 11:37 (stereo reduction from 8-channel original). Three Spaces in Mid-Air (2017), dur: 10:56 (stereo work, in three untitled movements). Le Chant en Dehors (2021-22) , dur: 10:08 (stereo reduction from 18 channel 'dome' format original). Programme notes and purchase information at https://electrocd.com/en/album/6578-espaces-lointains
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    Ensuring Student Mental Wellbeing whilst introducing Block Mode Intensive Learning and Teaching
    (Journal of Block and Intensive Learning and Teaching, 2024-04-24) Allman, Zoe
    As De Montfort University, a UK-based University, introduced block delivery across the undergraduate portfolio the University sought to maintain a continued focus on, and commitment to, an institution-wide approach to embedding mental wellbeing. With mental wellbeing relevant to the whole university community and recognising the power of transformational change to impact wellbeing, the university cross-examined student feedback to understand and ensure mental wellbeing. An intensive block model was introduced at De Montfort University (DMU) from the start of the academic session 2022-23. Undergraduate student experiences and learning from the initial months, focused on those in the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Media, are presented alongside an examination of the methods and impact of embedding mental wellbeing in this new intensive mode; ensuring the continued institutional approach to embedding mental wellbeing in the curriculum, providing inclusive support for all learners. The learning and impact identified from initial experiences indicate areas of strength and areas for development, enhancement and growth. This article presents educational practice implications for other providers exploring and implementing block delivery in intensive learning and teaching modes. The University’s HealthyDMU philosophy recognises mental wellbeing is relevant to all, informed by a social model of wellbeing, in which a student’s experience of mental wellbeing is directly related to their environment and experiences, based on the five ways to wellbeing (Aked, Marks, Cordon & Thompson, 2008). Embedding this throughout the curriculum reduces wellbeing barriers to facilitate student success, establishing pro-active approaches to mental wellbeing and a health promoting environment. This article provides a unique focus on student experience from the position of mental wellbeing embedded in curriculum design and delivery. This paper presents an exploration of student responses to the introduction of intensive delivery at undergraduate level within a UK university, positioned around support for mental wellbeing.
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    Electromagnetic time reversal for online partial discharge location in power cables: Influence of interfering reflections from grid components
    (Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), 2024-04-16) Ragusa, Antonella; Wouters, Peter A. A. F.; Sasse, Hugh; Duffy, Alistair; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos
    In online single-sided partial discharge (PD) location, the measured PD reflection patterns are affected by the characteristics of all the components of the associated power network. This paper analyses the performance of a PD location method based on electromagnetic time reversal (EMTR) theory, when interfering reflections contribute to the transient signals emitted by the PD event. The topology analysed is formed from a ring main unit (RMU) in a medium voltage grid with mixed cross-linked polyethylene and paper-insulated lead-covered (PILC) cable sections. The PD reflection patterns, observed at the RMU, are disturbed by the reflections coming from the impedance discontinuities of the circuit and by the reflections coming from the cable ends of the PILC cables connected to the RMU. The simulated configuration is chosen such that classical location techniques tend to fail due to overlapping peaks and other signal distortion. This is because the classic techniques are based on identifying individual reflection peaks from which the PD source can be determined via differences in time of arrival. The numerical investigation shows that the accuracy of the EMTR-based location method is robust against these effects, achieving a PD localisation with an error less than the 0.1%. The results also show that the EMTR-based method can localise PDs using a PD monitoring point located somewhere along the network and not necessarily at the line termination.
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    Consuming queerness: Jeffree Star and the paradox of profit and pleasure in the queer male beauty influencer
    (Taylor and Francis, 2024-04-17) Taylor, Allan S.
    Shirley Xue Chen and Akane Kanai (2021) raise debates about a privileged subset of gay men occupying the beauty space as ‘equal, if not more compelling, in fulfilling contradictory postfeminist demands of authenticity, individuality and femininity’. The suggestion in their argument is that the queer beauty influencer can somehow embody idealistic postfeminist traits without the stigma a woman may face for doing the same. This paper explores a counterargument for this in-your-face performance of hybridised gender and sexuality, in that the repetition of gender performatives through the queer body is an attempt to ‘re-present’ the social media beauty sphere through a queer lens where wearing makeup is an act of resistance. Using the influencer and makeup brand owner Jeffree Star as a case study, I argue that the queer beauty influencer exists as a body for fantasy projection, with makeup and associated makeup collections acting as the mediator for affective transference to bestow the influenced party with the transformative effect of queer resistance. However, the influencer and audience ultimately become bound back to the neoliberal ideals from which they attempt to break free. In positioning their own brand of cosmetics as a conduit through which their audience can obtain a sense of queer resistance, it ties the influencers and their audiences back to a capitalist framework. Because of this, the act of queer resistance can never fully be embodied by the audience, and so these repeated attempts at embodiment sustains the cycle of production and consumption that capitalises on the queer body. The paper calls this cycle a ‘paradox’, in that there is pleasure in consuming queerness, but the act of attempting to embody this queerness to break with beauty norms is set up to fail, which in turn manages to create a source of profit for the queer influencer where every new product release represents a new opportunity for the consumer to renew the attempt of queer embodiment through the application of cosmetics.
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    Performance, photography, theatricality and citationality: theatricality as a mode of performing citation in the still photographic image
    (Edinburgh University Press, 2024-04-24) Taylor, Allan S.
    Photography’s inherent theatricality has been evident since its origins, when Hippolyte Bayard first posed in protest at the endorsement of the Daguerrotype in his work, Self- Portrait As A Drowned Man (1839). Pauli (2006, 13-15) refers to Bayard as an actor, storyteller and photographer and the idea of posing for camera has become ingrained in our cultural consciousness. Initially this was due to the technical limitations of exposure times requiring a pose to be struck and held in order to create a successful photograph, but more latterly has become an intentional tool used both in domestic and professional photography in order to produce a certain effect. The tension that arises in photography as a medium in particular is what Barthes originally described as the particular claims it makes on presence and the spectator’s perceived desire for that realism that has given theatricality such a problematic position in photography (Barthes, 2000, 5-6). Theatricality has, historically, been disparaged particularly by Fried (1998b, 17, 164) who states its presence in artwork is somewhat soporific and encourages passivity in the spectator, stating such theatrical works project their presence onto the viewer and anticipates the role of cinema in contemporary practice. Taylor dismisses this antitheatrical approach, suggesting the constructedness of performance signals its artificiality to reveal an antitheatrical prejudice that in more complex readings recognises the constructed as coterminous with the real (Taylor 2003, 6). She states it is possible for performance to be ‘real’ in whatever terms it is understood by. This is confluent with Rancière’s notion that drama is necessary in imagery if there is to be any action (Rancière 2009, 87). Henry also supports this positive view of theatricality by describing the gesture specifically in relation to postmodern photography as that which ‘knows itself to be appearance’ – a self-reflexive ‘mirror’ revealing the nature of contemporary representation and that theatricality has historically (and perhaps wrongly) earned itself a bad name (Henry 2006, 113). She admits that while early-twenty-first century photography ‘makes no effort’ to deny the spectator constructed fictions, what underlies this is an invitation for the viewer to ‘participate in an imaginative engagement with representation itself and with the state of affairs in general’ (ibid., 154). In turn, she illustrates that the blurring between theatricality and photography is not caused by the fictions it creates per se but the way it can visually create situations and scenarios through which spectators can identify contemporary culture and their relationship to it. Therefore, the shift of perceiving the presence of performance and its associated theatricality in photographic works is not a matter of using performance as a form of dramatic metaphor and neither are these images intended to be fictitious pictorial narratives created for the camera. Though narrative may happen in the spectator’s individual enactment of the photograph, these acts are meant to be viewed as staged actions that call upon the practice of citationality as a way to disrupt, deconstruct and analyse performative utterances generated through performance. It is only through the intentional performance of such citations that are then captured and displayed as photographs that we can deconstruct, analyse and consider the role of such citations in contemporary culture. In this chapter, I examine the idea of employing theatricality as an intentional tool in photographic practice – particularly in instances of performance to camera – as a way of calling upon the power of citation as a way of ‘re-presenting’ culture to the spectator. As an intentional mode of delayed performance, this kind of practice allows the spectator the différance (or simultaneous distance and deferral, from Derrida, 1988) to consider such citations within a wider structural unconsciousness. Using Auslander’s arguments on the performativity of performance documentation and borrowing his example of Yves Klein’s Leap Into the Void (1960) and its subsequent appropriations by Yasumasa Morimura (2010) and Ciprian Muresan (2004), I will illustrate that beyond being used as a tool to proliferate and disseminate performance, photography that involves such performed and theatrical moments has a wider political, social and cultural function when viewed as a means of presenting and representing citation.
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    ‘But you know, there have been queer characters from the very first film’: Call Me by Your Name and the long shadow of James Ivory
    (Intellect, 2024-07-15) Monk, Claire
    The imprint of the veteran gay independent director James Ivory on Call Me by Your Name is fundamental: not merely as the 2017 film’s Academy Award-winning credited screenwriter, but via Ivory’s intimate involvement from 2007 onwards when the rights to André Aciman’s novel were first optioned. This chapter explores the contours of Ivory’s influence on Call Me by Your Name in cinematic–authorial and production–strategic terms to situate Call Me by Your Name’s remarkable 21st-century impact as LGBTQ+ cinema and same-sex romance in relation to Ivory’s longer and wider film oeuvre and to Merchant Ivory Productions’ collaborative, representational and promotional practices in their 44 years as a (widely and wilfully unacknowledged) queer filmmaking partnership. The chapter, firstly, offers a new, nuanced reading of Call Me by Your Name’s affinities with Ivory’s long-underrated affirmative gay film Maurice (1987), adapted from E. M. Forster’s posthumous 1971 novel – questioning viral social-media assertions about the ‘parallels’ between the two films which proliferated amid the rising 2017–2018 hype around the film – and, secondly, establishes Call Me by Your Name’s place and cinematic precursors within Ivory’s wider, less-known body of work beyond the ‘heritage film’ mode between 1963 and 2009, focusing particularly on Ivory’s films Slaves of New York (1988), A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries (1998) and The City of Your Final Destination (2009). Thirdly, drawing on archive and wider primary sources, the chapter establishes the senses in which Call Me by Your Name’s exceptional crossover success owed a debt to the innovative promotional and release strategies which had been rehearsed three decades earlier in the release of Merchant Ivory’s Maurice.
  • ItemOpen Access
    A Predictive Performance Analysis of Vitamin D Deficiency Severity Using Machine Learning Methods
    (IEEE, 2020-06-15) Sambasivam, G.; Jayavel, Amudhavel; Sathya, G.
    Vitamin D Deficiency (VDD) is one of the most significant global health problem and there is a strong demand for the prediction of its severity using non-invasive methods. The primary data containing serum Vitamin D levels were collected from a total of 3044 college students between 18-21 years of age. The independent parameters like age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat, bone mass, exercise, sunlight exposure, and milk consumption were used for prediction of VDD. The study aims to compare and evaluate different machine learning models in the prediction of severity in VDD. The objectives of our approach are to apply various powerful machine learning algorithms in prediction and evaluate the results with different performance measures like Precision, Recall, F1-measure, Accuracy, and Area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic (ROC). The McNemar’s test was conducted to validate the empirical results which is a statistical test. The final objective is to identify the best machine learning classifier in the prediction of the severity of VDD. The most popular and powerful machine learning classifiers like K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Decision Tree (DT), Random Forest (RF), AdaBoost (AB), Bagging Classifier (BC), ExtraTrees (ET), Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD), Gradient Boosting (GB), Support Vector Machine (SVM), and Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) were implemented to predict the severity of VDD. The final experimentation results showed that the Random Forest Classifier achieves better accuracy of 96 % and outperforms well on training and testing Vitamin D dataset. The McNemar’s statistical test results support that the RF classifier outperforms than the other classifiers.