Exposure to the IPCC special report on 1.5°C global warming is linked to perceived threat and increased concern about climate change

Date

2019-11-22

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

0165-0009

Volume Title

Publisher

Springer

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

This article investigates the influence of exposure to the IPCC special report on 1.5°C global warming on climate change attitudes. Among a nationally representative sample of the Norwegian public, we found that exposure to the report is associated with greater perceived threat from climate change and increased climate change concern. However, this association was modestly moderated by political orientation. Exposure to the report had a weaker association with perceived threat and climate change concern among politically right-leaning individuals, compared with their left-leaning counterparts, and there was no association between exposure to the report and climate change concern among individuals who self-identified as being on the far-right end of the political spectrum. We conclude that, despite the commonly observed tendency for biased assimilation of climate change information and polarisation of opinion among the public, scientific communication regarding climate risks may still have a viable role to play in promoting climate change engagement and action.

Description

The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.

Keywords

climate change, risk communication, concern, Norway

Citation

Ogunbode, C.A., Doran, R., Bohm, G. (2020) Exposure to the IPCC special report on 1.5°C global warming is linked to perceived threat and increased concern about climate change. Climatic Change 158, pp. 361-375

Rights

Research Institute

Institute for Psychological Science