A minority within a minority? Identity and Sexual Health in Black and Minority Ethnic Men Who Have Sex With Men in the United Kingdom

Date

2019-11

Advisors

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

ISSN

1055‐3290

Volume Title

Publisher

Elsevier

Type

Article

Peer reviewed

Yes

Abstract

Identity refers to the individual’s self-construal. It is characterized by multiple elements, such as sexuality, ethnicity, and religion, and not all identity elements are simultaneously salient (Jaspal & Breakwell, 2014). For instance, the same person might self-identify principally as gay at a Gay Pride March, as Muslim during Ramadan, as Pakistani during a cricket match, and as British when abroad. Social context is key to identity expression. Black and minority ethnic (BME) men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United Kingdom have multiple, often stig- matized, identity elements. Many face intersecting social stressors (e.g., racism and homophobia) that can increase the risk of poor sexual health. Many straddle the boundaries of seemingly incompatible identities, such as ethnicity and sexuality. In this commentary, we present a clinical case study, and relevant theory and research, to illustrate the practical importance of identity for effective sexual health care in this diverse population.

Description

Keywords

ethnic, HIV, identity, men who have sex with men, sexual health, social psychology

Citation

Jaspal, R. and Bayley, J. (2019) A minority within a minority? Identity and sexual health among Black & Minority Ethnic Men Who Have Sex With Men. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 30 (6), pp. 607-609

Rights

Research Institute

Mary Seacole Research Centre