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dc.contributor.authorHinsliff-Smith, K.
dc.contributor.authorChadborn, Neil
dc.contributor.authorDevi, Reena
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Adam
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Jay
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T14:46:57Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T14:46:57Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationChadborn, N.H., Devi, R. , Hinsliff-Smith, K., Gordon, A., Banerjee, J.(2020) Quality improvement in long term care settings: a scoping review of effective strategies used in care homes. European Geriatric Medicine, (In Press)en
dc.identifier.issn1878-7649
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/20136
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version.en
dc.description.abstractPurpose We conducted a scoping review of quality improvement in care homes. We aimed to identify participating occupational groups and methods for evaluation. Secondly, we aimed to describe resident-level interventions and which outcomes were measured. Methods Following extended PRISMA guideline for scoping reviews, we conducted systematic searches of Medline, CINAHL, Psychinfo, ASSIA (2000-2019). Furthermore, we searched systematic reviews databases including Cochrane Library and JBI, and the grey literature database, Greylit. Four co-authors contributed to selection and data extraction. Results 65 studies were included, 6 of which had multiple publications (75 articles overall). A range of quality improvement strategies were implemented, including audit-feedback and quality improvement collaboratives. Methods consisted of controlled trials, quantitative time series and qualitative interview and observational studies. Process evaluations, involving staff of various occupational groups, described experiences and implementation measures. Many studies measured resident-level outputs and health outcomes. 14 studies reported improvements to a clinical measure, however four of these articles were of low quality. Larger randomized controlled studies did not show statistically significant benefits to resident health outcomes. Conclusion In care homes, quality improvement has been applied with several different strategies, being evaluated by a variety of measures. In terms of measuring benefits to residents, process outputs and health outcomes have been reported. There was no pattern of which quality improvement strategy was used for which clinical problem. Further development of reporting of quality improvement projects and outcomes could facilitate implementation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectquality improvementen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjectcare home residentsen
dc.subjectcare homesen
dc.subjectresidential careen
dc.subjectscoping reviewen
dc.subjectstaffen
dc.subjectQIen
dc.subjectolder peopleen
dc.titleQuality improvement in long term care settings: a scoping review of effective strategies used in care homesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderOther external funder (please detail below)en
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NCen
dc.date.acceptance2020-08-26
dc.researchinstituteInstitute of Health, Health Policy and Social Careen
dc.funder.otherThis work was funded by the National Institute of Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for East Midlands (NIHR CLAHRC-EM).en


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