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dc.contributor.authorOgunbode, Charles Adedayo
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Rouven
dc.contributor.authorBoehm, Gisela
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-29T10:26:28Z
dc.date.available2020-07-29T10:26:28Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-16
dc.identifier.citationOgunbode, C.A., Doran, R. and Böhm, G. (2020) Individual and local flooding experiences are differentially associated with subjective attribution and climate change concern. Climatic Change,en
dc.identifier.urihttps://dora.dmu.ac.uk/handle/2086/20028
dc.descriptionThe file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link.en
dc.description.abstractWhile several studies show an association between flooding experience and climate change engagement, a few show no evidence of such a link. Here, we explore the potential that this inconsistency relates to the measurement of flooding experience in terms of individual versus local experience, and the subsumption of multiple distinct constructs within composite indicators of climate change engagement. Using national survey data from Norway, we show that individual and local flooding experiences differentially predict subjective attribution and climate change concern. People with individual flooding experience reported significantly greater climate change concern than those with local, or no, flooding experience. Subjective attribution of flooding to climate change did not differ significantly between people with individual versus local flooding experience, except among those with a right-wing political orientation where individual experience was associated with greater subjective attribution. Our findings highlight the need for careful operationalisation of flooding experience and climate change engagement in subsequent research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectFloodingen
dc.subjectExperienceen
dc.subjectAttributionen
dc.subjectClimate Changeen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.titleIndividual and local flooding experiences are differentially associated with subjective attribution and climate change concernen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-020-02793-4
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.funderNo external funderen
dc.cclicenceCC-BY-NC-NDen
dc.date.acceptance2020-07-07
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Psychological Scienceen


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