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dc.contributor.authorMair, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorElsey, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Paul V.en
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Patrick G.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T10:43:13Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T10:43:13Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationMair, M., Elsey, C., Smith, P. V. and Watson, P. G. (2016) The Violence You Were/n’t Meant to See: Representations of Death in an Age of Digital Reproduction. In: McGarry, R. and Walklate, S. (eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and War. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. pp. 425-443en
dc.identifier.isbn9781137431691
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2086/14437
dc.description.abstractThis chapter starts with a consideration of the opportunities the internet affords us to become virtual witnesses to episodes of military operations and the deaths they result in. It is organised around an analysis of two such episodes caught on video and disseminated via the internet, (1) the Wikileaks ‘collateral murder’ video, and (2) the video of the targeted assassination of Hamas’s Military Commander, Ahmed al-Jabari, by the Israeli Defence Force in 2012. Drawing on ethnomethodological studies as well as Goffman’s examination of the ‘workshop complex’ (which we will outline), we examine what these videos could be said to show through an analysis of the ways we are directed to view them by those who have made them available to us. We will suggest the question of who takes such footage public ‘first’ rather than ‘second’ is an important one as the opening establishes the terms in which a video’s status as evidence will be discussed. Having reviewed each case, and what could be said to have been done via the release of footage to the public in them, we end by sounding a note of caution around the notion that videos of either kind represent a straightforward medium of ‘truth’. What it means to ‘watch war’, as Miezskowski has pointed out (2011), is not easily resolved and, we shall argue in conclusion, we need to treat video footage as posing as many problems as it seems to resolve.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.subjectEthnomethodologyen
dc.subjectConversation Analysisen
dc.subjectWikiLeaksen
dc.subjectCollateral Murderen
dc.subjectVideo releasesen
dc.titleThe Violence You Were/n’t Meant to Seeen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-43170-7_23
dc.peerreviewedYesen
dc.explorer.multimediaNoen
dc.funderN/Aen
dc.projectidN/Aen
dc.cclicenceN/Aen
dc.researchinstituteMedia and Communication Research Centre (MCRC)en
dc.researchinstituteCinema and Television History Institute (CATHI)en
dc.researchinstituteInstitute for Allied Health Sciences Researchen


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